Sick of clutter? Why we can’t seem to get rid of it…

A busy mom and business owner, Julie Holmer has helped mobilize thousands of people for political issues in Plano. But, when it comes to managing clutter in her home, she’s paralyzed.”If I walk into a messy room, I don’t know where to begin,” she said.It wasn’t until she was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder as an adult that she realized her clutter issues might relate to how her brain is wired. Like many with ADHD, she’s easily distracted, and that derails efforts to

A busy mom and business owner, Julie Holmer has helped mobilize thousands of people for political issues in Plano. But, when it comes to managing clutter in her home, she’s paralyzed.
"If I walk into a messy room, I don’t know where to begin," she said.
It wasn’t until she was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder as an adult that she realized her clutter issues might relate to how her brain is wired. Like many with ADHD, she’s easily distracted, and that derails efforts to declutter.
"If I’m cleaning my office, I’ll come across a bill that needs paid, so I’ll sit down at my computer to pay the bill, then some emails pop up, and soon I’ve lost track of what I was doing," she said.
Julie Holmer says her efforts to declutter can be quickly derailed!
Holmer’s not alone. A growing body of brain research offers insights into why some people quickly fall adrift in too much stuff, while others seem to handle clutter effortlessly — and why too much clutter drives us crazy.
Brain scans in studies of people with hoarding disorder show specific patterns of "neural dysfunction" — clues to why they acquire too much stuff, get too emotionally attached to things, have trouble organizing their space and experience anxiety when they try to discard anything.
Read the rest of the article at:
https://www.dallasnews.com/life/better-living/2018/04/09/sick-clutter-whywe-cant-seem-get-rid